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IRREVOCABLE MARK: Works by Michael DeLucia, Jeffrey Scott Mathews, and Klea McKenna

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IRREVOCABLE MARK: Works by Michael DeLucia, Jeffrey Scott Mathews, and Klea McKenna
Curated by Jaime Alvarez and Anne Schaefer
April 4 – April 27, 2014
Opening Reception: Friday, April 4, 2014, 6pm -10pm

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PHILADELPHIA, PA-
Tiger Strikes Asteroid presents Irrevocable Mark, with work by Michael DeLucia, Jeffrey Scott Mathews and Klea McKenna, curated by Jaime Alvarez and Anne Schaefer. Please join us for the opening reception Friday, April 4, 2014, 6-10pm. 

Irrevocable Mark examines the work of three artists in which a specific technology is paramount to the resultant work. While this element is unique for each artist, their exhibited works are unified by an impossibility of revision or exact repetition due to the procedural framework of the artists’ practices, complicated by the often uncontrollable characteristics of their chosen substrate.  Each artist takes a leap of faith in the making of his or her work, knowing that the success or failure of the final work will be absolute and irrevocable upon the press of a button, the click of a mouse, or an irreversible manual fold of paper. When process meets a substrate with unique tactility, the resultant image, object or experience transcends the steps and reveals a singular, unrepeatable result that would not otherwise exist so precisely.

Michael DeLucia’s sculptures explore the compression and subsequent unflattening of form into the surface of plywood. Value, texture, gradient and depth are encoded in to the material’s surface through machine-routed strokes. The works appear clinical and precise, but looking under the layers where the material is exposed, one is confronted with entropy. His work has been exhibited at Eleven Rivington (NY), Galerie Nathalie Obadia (France), and Socrates Sculpture Park (NY). He lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

Jeffrey Scott Mathews’ interdisciplinary studio practice generates paintings, drawings, tapestries and sound. The embroidered work included in this exhibition records drawings on to cloth through the assistance of an embroidery machine. The imagery along with its interaction with the burlap substrate speaks to both the corporeal and the spiritual. His work has been exhibited throughout the United States including a recent solo show at Sadie Halie Projects (NY). He has additionally exhibited at Jolie Ladie (PA),  Blackston (NY), Center for Creative Studies (MI), and Pop Gallery (CA). Upcoming projects include an audio cassette tape release with Metaphysical Circuits in the Spring of 2014. He lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. 

Klea McKenna employs alternative photographic processes to respond to the landscape around her.  While the viewer may not see a traditional photograph, McKenna does in fact record the experience of the topographic light-scape through standard photographic means. She is co-founder and contributor to the website IN THE MAKE, a collaboration that offers an intimate look at current art practice through studio visits with West Coast artists. She has exhibited at Regina Rex (NY), Datz Museum of Art (South Korea), Zic Zerp Galerie (Netherlands), Von Lintel Gallery (NY), and Philadelphia Photo Arts Center (PA). She lives and works in San Francisco, CA.  

 

IRREVOCABLE MARK: Works by Michael DeLucia, Jeffrey Scott Mathews, and Klea McKenna
Curated by Jaime Alvarez and Anne Schaefer
April 4 – April 27, 2014
Opening Reception: Friday, April 4, 2014, 6pm -10pm

Irrevocable Mark : Works by Michael Delucia, Jeffrey Scott Matthews, and Klea Mckenna
April 4 - April 27, 2014 
Opening reception:  Friday, April 4, 2014, 6pm -10pm

Hours:  Saturday and Sunday, 2pm-6pm and by appointment
(484)-469-0319, tigerstrikesasteroid@gmail.com


Keith Crowley: Unseen

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Keith Crowley: Unseen
March 7 – March 30, 2014
Opening Reception: Friday, March 7, 2014, 6pm -10pm

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PHILADELPHIA, PA-
Unseen is a group of paintings that are distillations of photographic imagery. These thinly layered paintings conjure the anticipation of a moment or a memory of something briefly unveiled. The sources from which the images are gathered involve snapshots, newspapers, Youtube-stills or whatever possible place or thing reveals itself as uncannily familiar. The paintings possess a subtle degree of pictorial dissonance, which suggest potential encounters that may happen – or be missed entirely.   

Keith Crowley
has lived in Philadelphia since 2001 and Unseen will be his first solo exhibition as a member of Tiger Strikes Asteroid. Crowley previously exhibited at Bridgette Mayer Gallery from 2008 - 2013. Crowley received his MFA in Painting from the Savannah College of Art and Design and his BFA from Savannah College of Art and Design Art Education Studies: Mansfield University, Mansfield, PA. His work has been exhibited at Fjord, Fox Gallery: The University of Pennsylvania, The National Constitution Center, OCMC Second Space, PA, TSA/New York, Perkins Art Center, NJ, Alagon Gallery, IL.

Currently, Crowley works as a Preparator at the Princeton University Art Museum.

(Image: Nocturne (Effulgent Pause), 48 x 72” oil on aluminum panel)

Keith Crowley: Unseen
March 7 – March 30, 2014
Opening Reception: Friday, March 7, 2014, 6pm -10pm

Nan Adams and The Hitch-Hiker: 

The unseen, the known, the looming and the familiar in the paintings of Keith Crowley.

Keith Crowley’s paintings contain subtleties, discreet moments and blurred imagery that, when combined, produce something very particular. There is in fact a term for these qualities, these moments in philosophy; they are called “haecceities.” This term was coined by Duns Scotus to explain a person’s “thisness,” but seems apt when discussing Keith Crowley’s paintings as well. Like one’s relationship with another person, Crowley’s paintings are better known for their specificity than analyzed for their exact and clear content. Like the work of photographer Robert Adams, these works are at once familiar and mysterious, yet we cannot quite say why.

All of the works in “Unseen” give us a feeling that we have been in these places before. Whether the place is in front of a computer screen watching YouTube videos at midnight, or standing on a street at night in Northeast Philadelphia around Christmas time, the work and the places it depicts feel eerily familiar. Our view, though, of these familiar places is always changing. 

In one painting, “Nocturne (Effulgent Pause),” we see a non-descript building, lit ambiently by fluorescent light while another light source emanates from behind the building. The light from behind seems to suggest the imminent and looming arrival of something, or someone. Who, though, is hanging out behind this building so late at night? In another painting, “Nocturne (Vacant Fete),” our view shifts and we become the one looming outside at night, staring at the rows of houses, lit happily with Christmas lights. As is the case with many of Crowley’s paintings we seem to encounter the moment just before or the moment just after an event takes place. Our role as a viewer becomes vague in a sense; who are we in relation to these familiar places, these familiar scenes? What have we just missed? What are we just about to see? It is hard to say. In Crowley’s work, though, it is not something we necessarily need to find an answer to. The stillness of the painting just before or after the moment of the event is the place we are to rest on. We are to rest in the vague nature of the moment depicted and how it is depicted.

The paintings, with their thin, repeated layers of color and subtle, careful adjustments, have a mysteriousness that is only heightened by our vague relationship to them. The vague, yet highly familiar scenes are mirrored in the almost glassy, window-like surface of the work and very much felt through from layer to layer. In many ways these paintings of eerily familiar images are made in a manner that are indebted to the non-image based black paintings of Ad Reinhardt. As is the case with Reinhardt’s black paintings, Crowley’s work appears to become clearer and then subtler again the more time we spend with it. Edges of buildings seem to become more concrete and then dissolve into the darkness that surrounds them; ground that seems dark and solid becomes loose and watery as the color of each layer asserts itself when our eyes adjust. As we do when we look at early black and white photography, with its soft, dissolved and out of focus edges, we must allow our eyes to see what is put into the frame of the work as much as we must allow our minds to settle and accept what is not clarifiable, what we cannot put into focus.

The works in “Unseen” are very much as the title of the show leads you to believe. The paintings, like the places they depict, need to be experienced more than just seen and need to be known rather than simply met. They have a nature that, despite their stillness, is ever evolving, unknowable, but yet, familiar.

-Matthew Sepielli is an artist living and working in Philadelphia. He is currently pursuing his MFA at Bard College. Note: The title of the essay is derived from an episode of The Twilight Zone,“The Hitch-Hiker,” which originally aired in 1960.

Keith Crowley : Unseen
March 7 - March30, 2014 
Opening reception:  Friday, March 7, 2014, 6pm -10pm

Hours:  Saturday and Sunday, 2pm-6pm and by appointment
(484)-469-0319, tigerstrikesasteroid@gmail.com


DOWN THE DRAIN: NICHOLA KINCH

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Curated by Alexis Granwell

Nichola Kinch: Down the Drain
February 7– March 1, 2014
Opening Reception: Friday, February 7, 2014, 6pm -10pm

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PHILADELPHIA, PA- Tiger Strikes Asteroid is pleased to present a curatorial selection from TSA member Alexis Granwell. Please join us for our February exhibition, featuring the work of Nichola Kinch: Down the Drain.


Nichola Kinch received her MFA from Temple University, Tyler School of Art in PA and her BFA from Myers School of Art, University of Akron, Ohio. Ms. Kinch is an associate professor at Tyler School of Art. This exhibition includes a film project that was funded by a Vice Provost for the Arts Grant from Temple University, Philadelphia, PA USA.


In the essay The Mediation of the Vortex, author Matthew Borgen delivers a detailed and personal description of Nichola Kinchʼs apartment and an oddly poetic view of her bathroom. He describes her apartment as a microcosm for meditative contemplation that leads to invented scientific discovery.


From Borgen’s essay, The Meditation of the Vortex:
If one were to step into the tub and turn on the water there would be the customary sensation of water droplets landing from above. Looking down one would see this water roll over the contours of the body and subsequently follow the form of the basin to culminate in the generation of a tiny vortex at their feet. This vortex is the source of Kinchʼs film Drain, the latest in a series crafted for presentation in her work, Lithophane Electrotachyscope.
The electrotachyscope, invented in 1887 by Ottomar Anschutz, was one of several devices developed in parallel during the late 19th century for the purpose of creating a realistic illusion of movement. Prior to its creation, the Polish-born inventor had successfully developed an early version of stop motion photography. He placed positive transparent plates of his serial images around the circumference of a uniformly rotating wooden wheel operated by hand crank from behind the device. A strobe light mounted behind and at the apex of the wheel illuminated each image as it passed and created for the observer in front of the device, the illusion of motion.
In her custom-built electrotachyscope Kinch has replaced the traditional positive transparent plates with lithophanes, three- dimensional, translucent plaques, which, when backlit, reveal a detailed image. Traditionally these dimensional images were carved in wax and cast in porcelain. In this instance the frames of the film are carved into Corian by a CNC router.


Borgen is currently the Exhibitions Coordinator for Arcadia University. In addition he is an Adjunct Professor in the foundations curriculum and also teaches an advanced course in contemporary gallery installation.

Nichola Kinch: Down the Drain
February 7– March 1, 2014
Opening Reception: Friday, February 7, 2014, 6pm -10pm

Down The Drain : Nichola Kinch curated by Alexis Granwell
February 7th - March 1st, 2014 
Opening reception:  Friday, February 7th, 2014, 6pm -10pm

Hours:  Saturday and Sunday, 2pm-6pm and by appointment
(484)-469-0319, tigerstrikesasteroid@gmail.com


Additional images courtesy of Sam Fritch

Impossible Machines on Knightarts.org

Consider for a moment all of the gadgets and machines we utilize every day. We are constantly at the mercy of appliances, automobiles, phones, computers and even simpler tools such as screwdrivers and wedges. They tend to simplify certain tasks – without the right tools, certain jobs are impossible – but how often have glitches, overuse, or misuse actually complicated things? Benjamin White examines the unintended consequences and byproducts of systems which exist when an apparatus isn’t perfect, and since there are no 100 percent efficient machines, the show “Impossible Machines” at Knight Arts grantee exhibition space Tiger Strikes Asteroid has plenty to work with.

The works by White are notably glum in their color scheme, which is a neutral shade of concrete gray pretty much across the board. Constructed from mortar, these forms are mostly quite smooth and exact on the outside, with the exception of tiny air pockets and flaws in the material. These inconsistencies remind us immediately of the lofty (read: unattainable) task of absolute efficiency.

Benjamin White, "41 Cone Circle."

Benjamin White, “41 Cone Circle.”

Although the constructions in the gallery seem solid and even static, many of them are actually built with moving parts. Since they are composed of a substance like concrete, we perceive them to be like most other cement objects: sidewalks, bridge abutments or cinder blocks – all more or less immobile. White’s pieces are deceptive, though. One corkscrew-like sculpture spins around a central steel armature, its core bristling with textured cones of gray stone. Elsewhere, a hard-edged, Tetris-like piece rests on the floor, seemingly a dead weight, until one manipulates its precisely fit parts, which move around one another like gears.

Benjamin White, "Uni Versal Joint."

Benjamin White, “Uni Versal Joint.”

Functionless mechanisms such as these exemplify the idea of waste quite succinctly. Does this mean they are, in fact, perfect machines? If their intended goal is to typify inefficiency, then they succeed by leaps and bounds, as their parts flop lazily for no apparent reason or hang precariously from the ceiling. While the inventions of nuclear energy or plastics have wide ranging effects both helpful and hurtful, these creations remain much tamer, content to merely call these other concepts to mind.

Benjamin White, "Brittany/Bin Laden" and "Saw it in Person."

Benjamin White, “Brittany/Bin Laden” and “Saw it in Person.”

A few works act more like picture frames or frames of cultural reference than mechanical insights. Two pieces on metal pedestals retain the heavily industrial feel of the others, but behind glass rest magazine cutouts of a pair of dolled-up blonde women (Britney Spears?) and an image of a football stadium. Has all of our technological and social progress culminated only in bread and circuses or Hollywood excess?

Benjamin White, "Paestum."

Benjamin White, “Paestum.”

One tiny piece on a nearby windowsill also contains a glass top, and we are encouraged to peer inside at its contents. This view is more of a museum fixture than a frame, and inside we see the carapace from one of earth’s oldest organisms: a horseshoe crab. Its delicate remains are preserved inside this block of mortar and sealed, transparent top for future observation. It seems in stark opposition to the encased magazines that celebrate human achievement, while this modest reminder of nature merely presents nature without any pomp. It’s easy to become distracted by the lights and the fashion, but what or whom suffers at the expense of our pursuit of pleasure and distraction? How do the machines we forge today impact the world we will have to live in tomorrow?

By counter-intuitively harnessing the power of contraptions that accomplish nothing, Benjamin White provides us a buffer between ourselves and the tools and gadgets that we use and abuse. With this ability to step back and consider what we ultimately do to the planet and to each other through our technology, we can better understand that even the best of intentions sometimes have unexpected consequences. “Impossible Machines” will be on display at Tiger Strikes Asteroid through January 26.

Tiger Strikes Asteroid is located a 319 North 11th St., on the second floor, Philadelphia; tigerstrikesasteroid@gmail.com; tigerstrikesasteroid.com.

IMPOSSIBLE MACHINES: BENJAMIN WHITE

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Curated by Terri Saulin Frock

Benjamin White: Impossible Machines
January 3 – January 26, 2014
Opening Reception: Friday, January 3, 2014, 6pm -10pm

PHILADELPHIA, PA-
Tiger Strikes Asteroid wishes you all a joyful New Year. Please celebrate with us as we present our January exhibition Benjamin White: Impossible Machines, curated by Terri Saulin Frock. Please join us for the Opening Reception Friday, January 3, 2014, 6-10pm

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From the desk of Mr. Benjamin White:
What works? Take any invention, any system and you will find some kind of waste, inefficiency or unintended consequence. In some cases the consequence may far outweigh the contribution the invention has supplied. Oil. Nukes. Plastics. CO2. Fukushima. Great Pacific Garbage Patch. If humans do away with themselves, basically going out in “a blaze of glory” (read: a miserable, dreadful, painful, slow end) all the inventions, all the art, all the ideas – over all of humanity - will cease to be within the collective memory of human beings. Already The Holocaust, clinically perfected and precisely recorded by the Nazi war machine is becoming a distant, some would say “unsubstantiated,” memory, subject to the vagaries of nationalism, denial and falsehoods. “The truth will out.” Shakespeare says. But how does it emerge from the cacophony of misinformation, and how long does it take? The military industrial complex, health insurance, drinking water, the whole notion of financial markets are, I think, oddly, based on a strange relationship to God! An impossible machine based on faith (in the integrity of the institution); guilt (that we have not done enough to pay our own way); debt (for your kindness or your generosity); vengeance (sometimes it is ok to hit back); forgiveness (it is never ok to hit back): supporting and codifying our antic behavior as we need. And below the ethical/moral onionskin, our genetics, our predisposition for health, cancer, mayhem, order…in our own way we are also impossible machines.

Benjamin White is 51: Old enough to be old to the young and young enough to be young to the old. He has seen a fair amount of mistakes and crap-olla, corruption, dictators, dictatorial destruction, and the rise of corrupt, but “better than” systems. He is amazed that so many things work - thanks usually to a tendency among human beings to make kind decisions - and that more things don’t go dreadfully wrong - usually due to someone suggesting that we stop doing such and such and start doing something else that is a little better. An impossible machine is one that will never work. If it works, it will never do anything.

Benjamin White: Impossible Machines
January 3 – January 26, 2014
Opening Reception: Friday, January 3, 2014, 6pm -10pm

Impossible Machines : Works by Benjamin White curated by Terri Saulin Frock
January 3rd - January 26th, 2014 
Opening reception:  Friday, January 3rd, 2014, 6pm -10pm

Hours:  Saturday and Sunday, 2pm-6pm and by appointment
(484)-469-0319, tigerstrikesasteroid@gmail.com


CHORUS EFFECT: A Tiger Strikes Asteroid & FJORD Collaboration

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 Curated by Tabitha Piseno

November 1 - December 15, 2013
Opening Reception: Friday, November 1, 2013, 6-10PM
@ Tiger Strikes Asteroid and FJORD

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- PHILADELPHIA
Referring to the term’s heterogeneous meaning within the realm of sound, Greek plays, and an electro-magnetic phenomena caused during aurora borealis, Chorus, is used here as an exhibition title to exemplify collective voice. A multitude of pitches similar in tone converge and are perceived as one; boundaries dissolve, and space between locations is mediated. Members of both organizations are dispersed amongst both spaces, coalescing into one exhibition presenting work each member is most involved within their studio, providing insight into manifestations unfolding within studio practice that are representative of the energy necessary to maintain an active practice as an artist while creating infrastructures through which to exhibit, teach, and learn about art in the context of Philadelphia. A, chorus, and effect, generating degrees of sincerity, of fervent commitment, that would be absent if the effect were not generated by a multitude of voices.

The selection of works in each space was made to be an inherent kind of score resounding with the space they inhabit; to exist together in a way that would make works commune not only with the scale and particularities of the space they are displayed within, but also with one another’s stylistic sensibilities. Together, they create an environment of works representing organic building, physical, surface density executed with the influence of their subjective experience, or sociopolitical perspective. 

Please join Tabitha Piseno and the members of Tiger Strikes Asteroid and FJORD for the opening reception at both exhibition spaces during CITYWIDE, on Friday, November 1, 6-8p

Tabitha Piseno is the co-founder and director of R.K. Projects, a nomadic conceptual vehicle for displacing the gallery framework via migrating curatorial projects, experimental events, and commissions that are temporarily presented in available commercial, industrial, and institutional real estate. Founded in 2010, the project is supported by the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation’s SEED Grant program, and is conducted in New York, Providence, RI, and in Spring of 2013 traveled to Brussels, Belgium for a site-specific off-fair taking place during Art Brussels. She has been a Regular Contributor to BOMBlog since 2008, and is currently working in New York for Martos Gallery/Shoot the Lobster’s Chelsea location.

CITYWIDE is a collaborative effort between 23 artist-run spaces in which, for the month of November, spaces will collaborate with each other to create unique programming and events all celebrating the spirit of artists run galleries. It is funded by the Knight Foundation and Samuel L. Fels foundation. 
 

CHORUS EFFECT: A Tiger Strikes Asteroid & FJORD Collaboration
Curated by Tabitha Piseno
November 1 - December 15, 2013
Opening Reception: Friday, November 1, 2013, 6-10PM
@ Tiger Strikes Asteroid and FJORD

CHORUS EFFECT: A TIGER STRIKES ASTEROID & FJORD COLLABORATION
November 1 - December 15, 2013 
Opening reception:  Friday, November 1st, 2013, 6pm -10pm

Hours:  Saturday and Sunday, 2pm-6pm and by appointment
(484)-469-0319, tigerstrikesasteroid@gmail.com


A Conversation with Anne Schaefer and Terri Saulin Frock

The Garden of Forking Paths: A Conversation with Anne Schaefer and Terri Saulin Frock

Garden of Forking Paths on Knightarts.org

Jorge Luis Borges, the Argentinean writer and thinker, proved to be among the most interesting and creative figures of the 20th century through his short stories and essays that delve into the labyrinthine recesses of the human mind and the vast universe we inhabit. It is a testament to his imagination that his ideas are still inspiring artists to this day, and the current show at Tiger Strikes Asteroid pays this notion credence. This Knight Arts grantee is currently showcasing ceramic work by Terri Saulin Frock in a show entitled “The Garden of Forking Paths” after a Borges story of the same name.

Terri Saulin Frock, "Cross Plinth w/ Trefoils, Swept and Offset."

Terri Saulin Frock, “Cross Plinth w/ Trefoils, Swept and Offset.”

The objects which Saulin Frock has assembled for this exhibit appear piecemeal in their parts but precise in their execution. They are sound and structural, yet possess a decrepit, ancient air about them. Their existence is so curious that one can’t help but study them or desire to scale the embossed, brick-like walls of works like “Cross Plinth w/ Trefoils, Swept and Offset.” At times the tiny protrusions on these vase-sized creations resemble wood or scaffolding, while their central towers are often reminiscent of fortifications. The heights of these towers are not so high, however, and they exist as models or miniatures of what their otherwise formidable-looking walls could be.

Terri Saulin Frock, "Perforated Stretcher Bond w/ Projecting Fins" showing the tall steel and concrete pedestal.

Terri Saulin Frock, “Perforated Stretcher Bond w/ Projecting Fins” showing the tall steel and concrete pedestal.

Each piece is bestowed with a certain ambiguity that explores the potential sources of the forms that the artist constructs. Saulin Frock derives the vocabulary for these images from a variety of places—including maps of her urban garden, travels abroad, and home renovations—while also paying heed to the metaphysical meanderings of Borges. All of these works rest atop flat blocks of speckled concrete, and many also rise up on black metal pedestals. These elements tie the creations together through their display, highlighting Saulin Frock’s attention to presentation beyond the pieces themselves. The smooth, hard edges of the surfaces they reside on act as a visual antithesis to the rounded, textured compositions of the sculptures themselves.

Terri Saulin Frock, "Moose."

Terri Saulin Frock, “Moose.”

In the story “The Garden of Forking Paths,” Borges details a history outside of time and a network of realities in which all possibilities are inherently true. Saulin Frock seems to amass her ceramic artworks from a similar web of potential, but crafts them in a bristling alabaster and lets their physical structure speak for itself. Occasionally the artist arranges her creations with tiny bits of wood or moss in settings that bestow the structures with the suggestion of an outdoor location without explicitly removing them from their stony or steely gallery fixtures. If Saulin Frock’s pieces like “Moose” include any hint of a garden, it is just that: a hint. The sparse sprigs of plant matter are present but retreat into the background and the garden appears more like an archaic town than anything else.

All of the objects here, like the intricate workings of a Borges tale, seem intent on opening the floodgate of questions and musings without offering solutions. They operate as microcosm for our wildly complicated universe, amalgamating parts of one artist’s interpretation into forms that both fold in self-referentially, and expand indefinitely outward with potential meanings.

Terri Saulin Frock: The Garden of Forking Paths

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PHILADELPHIA, PA- Tiger Strikes Asteroid welcomes you to our October exhibition, The Garden of Forking Paths. The show features the work of TSA member Terri Saulin Frock. This is her second solo exhibition with the gallery. Please join us for the Opening Reception Friday October 4, 2013, 6-10pm

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“The Garden of Forking Paths is an incomplete, but not false, image of the universe as Tsʼui Pên conceived it. In contrast to Newton and Schopenhauer, your ancestor did not believe in a uniform, absolute time. He believed in an infinite series of times, in a growing, dizzying net of divergent, convergent and parallel times. This network of times which approached one another, forked, broke off, or were unaware of one another for centuries, embraces all possibilities of time. We do not exist in the majority of these times; in some you exist, and not I; in others I, and not you; in others, both of us. In the present one, which a favorable fate has granted me, you have arrived at my house; in another, while crossing the garden, you found me dead; in still another, I utter these same words, but I am a mistake, a ghost.”
- Jorge Luis Borges


Saulin Frock considers The Garden of Forking Paths a chapter in an endeavor that has been developing over the past ten years. As drawings and objects accumulate, they function as “visual counterpoint,” layering information to produce an imagined time-lapse view/code of a world. The vocabulary of forms is culled from a variety of sources such as maps of her urban garden, home renovation, travels abroad, the writings of Jorge Luis Borges, and Glenn Gould’s “Goldberg Variations: The Well Tempered Clavier.”


Terri Saulin Frock received her MFA from the University of the Arts and her BFA from Moore College of Art and Design in Philadelphia. Currently, she is teaching the course “Critical Discourse” at Moore College of Art & Design, and a variety of ceramics and sculpture classes in the BFA & Young Artistʼs Workshop programs. Additionally, Terri Saulin Frock also teaches Pre-school classes to children at Society Hill Synagogue.


Terri Saulin Frock: The Garden of Forking Paths
October 4 – October 27, 2013 Opening Reception: Friday, October 4, 2013, 6pm -10pm
Partial funding for this exhibition has come from a Faculty Development Grant from Moore College of Art and Design. Many Thanks!
* This show is dedicated to the loving memory and history of friendship Terri shared with Deborah Ann Deery. Thank you Deborah for your constant and generous positive energy, support and brilliant light that shines in all you have touched.

The Garden of Forking Paths : Terri Saulin Frock
October 4- October 27, 2013 
Opening reception:  Friday, October 4, 2013, 6pm -10pm

Hours:  Saturday and Sunday, 2pm-6pm and by appointment
(484)-469-0319, tigerstrikesasteroid@gmail.com


THEME BY PARTI